The food of Norfolk

From its exceptional seafood to its cereal crops and soft fruit, Norfolk is a county of rich food production.

Cromer, on the north eastern coast of Norfolk is famous for Cromer Crabs, which are prized for their tender flesh and high proportion of white meat and are absolutely perfect for a summer salad of dressed crab.  Other loBrancaster Staithe fishing boatscal shellfish are mussels, which are still traditionally hand gathered and graded in places like Brancaster Staithe, making them a sustainable and delicious local delicacy at many of the pubs and restaurants along the Norfolk coast.

Norfolk Samphire, grows on the tidal mud and salt marshes around the coast and has become something of a gourmeCley Windmillt vegetable in recent years, revered by many top chefs.  It has fleshy green stems which are delicious when lightly steamed or boiled and served with a dollop of butter or a drizzle of fine extra virgin olive oil.  With a texture similar to asparagus, but with a definite hint of the sea in its taste, it’s not surprisingly that Norfolk Samphire is commonly known as sea samphire, although its other alternative of ‘poor man’s asparagus’ is hard to believe these days, given its growing culinary status. During the summer monthly, samphire is widely available at Norfolk’s markets and framers’ markets or sometimes at roadside stalls, but you might also find it at your local fishmonger too if they are savvy, as it makes a superb accompaniment to freshly grilled fish.

Norfolk is full of fascinating places to see and visitors have a wide choice of places to stay, many with a reputation for good food. The converted Cley Windmill offers a magical and romantic place to stay for a few days whilst enjoying the county, with atmospheric meals by candlelight available in the evenings.

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